Finished Owls

So there Owls In Tree mittens are all done! And they are adorable. I must admit the pattern grew on me during the project^^ Not that I didn’t like it before, I just like it much more now. They were fun to do. I love the cuff with the edging, the latvian braid and the cuff chart. And of course the mitten chart in it self. Also I love the palm chart. It’s simple and very classic and makes the mitten more durable.

I wrote in the long post about the owls in tree mittens that I was trying to knit looser so all my mittens wouldn’t be size S/M women’s and it worked out! I have a tendency to knit very tight – and changing needles doesn’t seem to help a bit (Im strange!) so I used quite a lot of concentration to make myself knit looser throughout this project. I think I found a good flow in it so this experiment was a success.

Finished Owl In Tree Mittens. Pattern: Fact Woman from Mod Knits. Knit by: Anne Grove

Finished Owl In Tree Mittens. Pattern: Fact Woman from Mod Knits. Knit by: Anne Grove

I had a little trouble finding the time for blocking these mittens as I sunday: went to Copenhagen to teach a course in needle binding (for what must have been about 80 people – and two other teachers), monday: worked 8am to 8pm fixating and washing about 14 meters of banners I dyed last week and tuesday: worked from 9am-3pm cutting banners, overlocking sides and generally finishing it all up. So it totals to about 49 working hours in three days. Phew! I’m happy to start a fun and silly kids mitten now.

Oh and here is a little thing about how to finish up. You know those single stitches that just seems to disappear into your knit work? Well here is what I do to make them come out into the work again:

How I treat hiding stitches in colorknitwork.

How I treat hiding stitches in colorknitwork.

No heat = cold and wet mittens

Sooo. I know I promised you all a final update on the Flamingo Mitten today but I can’t give you that. Last night I put the mittens on the blocking board, sprayed them with warm water and put them on the radiator just to notice it was ice cold. It turned out to be the entire apartment. No wonder I had been freezing the hole day.

At least I have mittens to help me keep warm. Oh wait! They were all wet and cold too >_< All I can give you is a picture of the blocking process and a little natter about what that is.

In the finishing process of knitting (after the knitting it self is done) you need to block your knit work. The reason for this is to release the tension of the yarn. When you knit the stitches the yarn get slightly twisted and this makes the textile tens. To get the yarn to relax you pin the work on a board and spray with lukewarm water. In this process you can also shape your work in what way you want. Knit work is very flexible. It is important to use a measuring tape and/or a ruler to ensure you evenly stretch your work otherwise you can of course “ruin” the work. However you can always reblock your work if the result isn’t what you wanted.

One thing you should remember not to block is ribbing. What makes the ribbing have the elasticity is the tension of the yarn and the stitch. If you block the ribbing you will take out the elasticity and it will loose it’s purpose. Some do use ribbing for a visual reason and then, of course, blocking only makes the finished result better.

Flamingo Mittens and last Gnome Mitten on the blocking board.

Flamingo Mittens and last Gnome Mitten on the blocking board.

To block your work can be a very big help to even out those big stitches that always get into your work. And it can also be a very good help to get color work to look much much nicer and done by a prof knitter. The equivalent in sewing is ironing your seams. It gives a much smoother appearance and a more professional look to the finished work.

Flamingo Mittens

Flamingo Mittens